Marussia will use the Williams-designed KERS units for the 2013 season

The Marussia F1 team will stick with Cosworth engines for the 2013 season – the last under the current engine regulations – as well as enter into partnership with Williams to run its Kinetic Energy Recovery System (KERS) next year.

The announcement came about as a result of a team-released interview conducted with technical consultant, Pat Symonds.

“Yes we will be using KERS next year,” he said.

“We plan to adopt the system that has been developed by Williams, which was used by them with the Cosworth engine last year and is currently with their Renault-engine car. Our 2013 unit is a development of this.

“We plan to adopt the system that has been developed by Williams, which was used by them with the Cosworth engine last year and is currently with their Renault-engine car. Our 2013 unit is a development of this.”

The Sheffield-based outfit is one of two teams – the other being fellow minnow outfit and Cosworth user HRTF1 – not to run KERS this season.

While it is believed that the latter will continue with Cosworth power next season as well, Marussia has already elected to do so for what is believed to be the English engine-builder’s final season in F1, unless it can secure at least four teams on its books when the new turbo engine regulations come into effect in 2014.

“We are happy with the work we are doing with them and I think that we are working together to try and improve the areas that we are able to under the [current] regulations,” Symonds added.

“We are concentrating on improving the driveability of the engine and enhancing its performance as a unit with the car.”

Despite still being at the back of the grid, Symonds believes the team is making steady progressNext year’s car, the MR02, will benefit from the developments – technically and in-house – that the small team has undergone over the course of this year, not least of which being the outfit’s sensible decision to scrap its CFD-only design philosophy it applied to its 2010 and 2011 challengers when it raced under its Virgin Racing moniker.


“We have experienced a lot of new heights – getting our windtunnel programme working, delivering performance to the car in a cost-effective way, improving our procedures,” Symonds continued.

“It is important to remember that we’re a very new team, and therefore there is an awful lot to be addressed.

“But I think rather than a single highlight there is just a continual improvement – a slow march forward towards the leaders and our direct competitors. Those are the things that give us some confidence in where we are heading.”

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Richard Bailey

Founder & Chief Editor at MotorsportM8
Hasn't missed a Grand Prix since 1989. Has a soft spot for Minardi. Tattooed with 35+ Grand Prix circuits.

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