McLaren
© 2017, directed by Roger Donaldson

The life and death of Bruce McLaren has been laid bare in a brilliant documentary following the New Zealander’s career in motor racing.

Showing a vast array and mix of old footage and photos with interviews from those close to the racing pioneer, McLaren is a film for racing nerds and casual fans alike.

One of the greatest aspects in the storytelling from people who were on the team when it was founded, working simultaneously on their Formula One, Can-Am and Indianapolis 500 entries, reflecting on Bruce, the man and being a part of Mclaren, the team.

The usage of period footage is an amazing inclusion to the film, given not only how rare it would have been back in the day but how well it has been preserved to be of standard so it could be used.

There is a major focus on the early years before the formation of the team as well as the early years of running what would be a racing dynasty.

As with Senna, there is an unfortunate lack of information on what happened post-death, especially the successes McLaren has had in terms of their modern day championships in the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s.

While it is great to see the old proper McLaren orange dominate the screens and a shame the current Formula One cars aren’t in the same colour; one could argue their recent form would be doing a disservice to the famous papaya orange winning ways.

Although his life was tragically cut short at the age of 32 while testing for a Can-Am race, the legacy of Bruce lives on in McLaren’s current status of having 8 Constructors’ and 12 Drivers’ Championship titles in Formula One, not to mention their ever growing road car operation.

McLaren is a film you don’t want to miss seeing if you can catch a session at the cinemas and one you need to occupy your top shelf of DVDs.

Image and video via McLaren Film

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Jordan Mulach

Journalist at MotorsportM8
Canberra born and raised journalist. Studying Sports Media. iRacing addict
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