Formula E and the FIA have released images of the final design for the second generation Formula E race car.

The car – to be used from the start of its fifth season (2018-19) of the all-electric championship – will be shown off to the public at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show in March 6, with the final technical specifications to also be announced at that time.

As is the case with the current generation car, the chassis and aerodynamic package of the car will be a controlled item, while each Formula E manufacturers will develop their own electric powertrains. The second generation car will also retain the use of a control specification battery, however improvements in battery technology will allow each ePrix race to be completed for the first time using a single car.

The images show a number of design features which will be present in the new car. In a departure from traditional single seater design, the car’s front wheels are enclosed within individual pods, while the rear wheels also fall underneath the rear bodywork of the car.

There is also a visible reduction in aerodynamic devices on the upper surfaces of the car, compared to the original Formula E car.

The front wing – which spans from pontoons below the nose of the car out to the front wheel pods – has a single adjustable flap on each side. At the rear of the car, in place of a large, central wing, there is a smaller wing on each side of the car above the rear wheel bodywork. The rear view of the car is dominated by the large diffuser emerging from underside, suggesting a significant increase in underbody aerodynamics counters the reduction in upper body aero.

As expected, the car features the controversial Halo driver head protection device, but in what is possibly the most aesthetically pleasing installation seen to date. Having been incorporated in the car from the start of the clean sheet design makes the Halo seem far better integrated into the Formula E car than on other, more traditional-appearing single seaters.

The Gen2 car's front wing spans from pontoons below the nose of the car out to the front wheel pods
The Gen2 car a visible reduction in aerodynamic devices on its upper surfaces
The Gen2 car features two small rear wings and a large diffuser
The Gen2 car features the controversial Halo driver head protection device
The the car’s front wheels are enclosed within individual pods, while the rear wheels also fall underneath the rear bodywork of the car

Speaking as the design images were released, Formula E CEO Alejandro Agag did not understate how important he feels the new generation car will be.

“This car represents the future of racing,” he said.

“When we started Formula E, our goal was to break the mould and challenge the status quo – bringing a revolution to motorsport. This next generation car represents that revolution.

“The cars will be faster and will have almost double the amount of energy storage capacity and double the range, demonstrating the continuous evolution of battery technology. Together with the FIA, we’ve achieved a great milestone with the introduction of this car and I can’t wait to see it on track.”

Touted as “the first car ever to be created by the governing body for motor sport”, FIA President Jean Todt was excited by the FIA’s development of the car, having brought together leading motorsport designers and engineers to work on the concept.

“Today we show for the first time the design of the next FIA Formula E Championship’s generation car, and I’m sure that everyone will be very excited by how futuristic and advanced it is. I’m very proud that the FIA has been at the forefront of this car’s development. I can’t wait to take the covers off the real car when it will be seen for the first time in Geneva on March 6.”

While the new car will see daylight for the first time in Geneva next month, the ABB FIA Formula E Championship will first resume with Round 4 of the 2017-18 series – the inaugural Santiago ePrix – this Saturday, February 3.

Images via FIA Formula E Championship

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Mitch Timms

Journalist at MotorsportM8
Professional motorsport engineer and all-round tech head.
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