Launched this week, F1 Fantasy is the first official interactive online game for fans to compete with one another throughout the real-life Formula One World Championship. Here’s our guide outlining how to play and be competitive against the rest of the world for the remainder of the season.

The aim of the game is to score the most points against other players by drafting your best driver and constructor line-up using a fantasised budget of $100 million. Players must draft five unique drivers and one constructor. Points are compiled from every driver’s real-life performances at each Grand Prix during the remainder of the Formula 1 season.

Drivers and Constructors are valued based on their ability. As expected, Lewis Hamilton is the most expensive driver valued at $29.8M, almost one-third of your team’s budget. Down the other end, Charles Leclerc is priced at just $4.5M as he is a rookie and in the lower-performing Sauber team, most likely only being able to score minimal points.

For constructors, Mercedes are valued at $30M whereas Alfa Romeo Sauber sit at $5M, 15% of the value of the four-time champions. It must be noted, driver and constructor budgets come under the same $100M the player starts off with to spend. Perhaps this is FOM’s way if displaying that a cost-cap could actually work?

Points are awarded to drivers by their performances across a Grand Prix weekend during qualifying and the race. A driver will earn points by qualifying well, beating their teammate, gaining positions during the race, et cetera. Drivers can lose points for failing to qualify or finish a race. Some scoring criteria run off a quota system where drivers who finish higher than other drivers earn more points than a lower-placed driver.

Constructor points are accumulated from both of their real-life drivers’ performances over the weekend. For example, if you were to have McLaren as your chosen constructor, you would reap the points from Fernando Alonso and Stoffel Vandoorne. If you were to have one or both of their drivers on your team, you would also get their individual points counted as extra onto your overall score for the weekend.

It is not recommended that you draft two drivers from the same team and the team itself, as you risk investing most of your budget into the one team who could have a disastrous weekend as Haas and Red Bull Racing demonstrated in the Australian and Bahrain Grands Prix respectively. A full list of the scoring matrix will be listed at the bottom of the guide.

Players must also nominate a ‘turbo driver’ in their drafted team. A turbo driver is nominated by the player before each event where the chosen driver will earn double points over the weekend. This also can be a risk as drivers who score in the negative will cost the player, as their negative score will be doubled.

Turbo nominated drivers cannot be a constructor at all or a driver valued over $20M as players can easily boast huge amounts of points on drivers who are reliable at scoring high thanks to their success on track. Players therefore are forced to choose drivers within the extensive and ever-so-close midfield providing lots of variable outcomes for players.

Over time as drivers and constructors find success or failure, their value will increase and decrease after each event. If you happen to own a driver who rises in value over time and decide to trade them, then the surplus of the driver’s increased value is awarded back to you. This feature can also come back and bite you if your driver happens to decrease in value over time. It is possible for players to have a team value higher than $100M by the end of the season.

F1 Fantasy

An example of a team line-up in F1 Fantasy

Above is a fantasy team for illustrative purposes. The player’s team includes Mercedes as their constructor meaning their huge investment proves to have a better chance of paying dividends each weekend as the championship-winning team is more reliable at scoring major points due to their front-running pace.

Daniel Ricciardo – the fourth most valued driver – is a great pick at a substantially costly price. His on-track ability and world-class overtaking can haul in lots of points during a race. He risks losing out to Max Verstappen in qualifying, however. Esteban Ocon at $11.3M is also a good pick. Although the Force India’s pace has not been too good so far this season, he can beat his real-life teammate Sergio Pérez where serious points can be earned. Meanwhile, Carlos Sainz has been selected as the Turbo driver for the next round meaning he will earn double points. He has a challenge to beat his teammate of Nico Hülkenburg, but good Qualifying and Race results can bring in points; Romain Grosjean can also do the same in his dark-horse paced Haas. Leclerc (as said before the cheapest valued driver) can play a strong teammate game and once again gain points for beating his teammate, regardless of his finishing position. The remaining budget however is $17.7M which could be used to swap a lower priced driver for a higher one. It is strongly recommended to use as much of your opening budget as you can in order to gain as many points as possible.

Using a mock score based on the last time drivers were out at the Chinese Grand Prix, the team’s final score would be a total of 132. This is a slightly competitive score however not all of the budget was used.

The scoring for each driver below shows as followed (reflecting the official F1 Fantasy scoring criteria included at the end of the guide as written before):

  • Ricciardo – 47 (5 – Qualify P6, 3 – Q3 Appearance, 25 – 1st Place, 1 – Finishing Race, 3 – Beating teammate in race, 10 – 5+ Overtakes)

  • Sainz – 16 (2 – Qualify P9, 3 – Q3 Appearance, 2 – 9th Place, 1 – Finishing Race) x2 Turbo Driver

  • Ocon – 8 (2 – Q2 Appearance, 1 – Finishing Race, 3 – Beating teammate in Race, 2 – 1 Overtake)

  • LeClerc – 4 (1 – Q1 Appearance, 2 – Out Qualifying teammate, 1 – Finishing Race)

  • Grosjean – -3 (1 – Qualify P10, 3 – Q3 Appearance, 2 – Out Qualifying teammate, 1 – Finishing Race, -10 – Losing 5+ places from inside top 10)

  • Mercedes – 60 (Hamilton: 23 & Bottas: 37)

Fans can also join public leagues or create private leagues with their friends to compete. Awards however are only won by placing in the overall competition. Players will automatically be put in leagues from the country they’re from and their favourite team with other players from around the world.

The first official round of F1 Fantasy kicks off during next weekend’s Azerbaijan Grand Prix, the fourth round of the 2018 Formula 1 World Championship.


Point Scoring Criteria

Qualifying

  • Top-10 Qualifiers: Points awarded on a 10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 sliding scale to the fastest ten qualifiers in Q3
  • Did not progress to Q2: 1 pt
  • Progressed to Q2 but did not progress to Q3: 2 pts
  • Progressed to Q3: 3 pts
  • Qualified ahead of teammate: 2 pts (driver only)
  • Outside 107% Q1 cut-off: -5 pts (driver only)

Race

  • Top-10 Finishers: Points awarded on a 25-18-15-12-10-8-6-4-2-1 sliding scale to the top ten finishers
  • Finished the race: 1 pt
  • Finished ahead of teammate: 3 pts (driver only)
  • Finished race and gained positions relative to starting position: 2 pts per place gained (maximum 10 pts)
  • Started in the top-10, but lost positions relative to starting position: -2 pts per place lost (max -10 pts)
  • Started outside the top-10, but lost positions relative to starting position: -1 pt per place lost (max -5 pts)
  • DNF: -15 pts (driver only)
  • Disqualified: -20 pts (driver only)

Streaks

  • Driver qualifies in the top-ten for five races in a row: +5 pts
  • Driver finishes in the top-ten for five races in a row: +10 pts
  • Constructor qualifies both cars in the top-ten for three races in a row: +5 pts
  • Constructor has both drivers finish in the top-ten for three races in a row: +10 pts
  • Top-10 Finishers: Points awarded on a 25-18-15-12-10-8-6-4-2-1 sliding scale to the top ten finishers
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Luke McCullough

Journalist at MotorsportM8
Melbourne based and Australian Grand Prix enthusiast with over 10+ years of attendance.
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