BIOGRAPHY
Full Name Mario Gabriele Andretti
Nationality American
Born 28 February 1940, Montona
Son Michael Andretti
Website Official Website
Twitter @marioandretti
Instagram @andrettimario
FORMULA 1 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP CAREER
Entries Races Non-Starts Poles Wins Podiums F/L Pts DNFs
131 128 3 18 12 19 10 180 72
First Grand Prix Last Grand Prix
1968 United States Grand Prix 1982 Las Vegas Grand Prix
Season Team Chassis Engine Races Poles Wins Podiums F/L Pts Rank
1968 Lotus 49B Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 1 1 0 0 0 0 NC
1969 Lotus 49B
63
Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 3 0 0 0 0 0 NC
1970 March 701 Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 5 0 0 1 0 4 16th
1971 Ferrari 312B
312B2
Ferrari 3.0 F12 3
2
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
9
3
8th
1972 Ferrari 312B2 Ferrari 3.0 F12 5 0 0 0 0 4 12th
1974 Parnelli VPJ4 Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 2 0 0 0 0 0 NC
1975 Parnelli VPJ4 Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 12 0 0 0 1 5 14th
1976 Lotus
Parnelli
77
VPJ4B
Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 13
2
1
0
1
0
3
0
1
0
21
1
6th
1977 Lotus 78 Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 17 7 4 5 4 47 3rd
1978 Lotus 78
79
Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 5
11
1
8
1
5
2
5
1
2
15
49
1st
1979 Lotus 79
80
Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 12
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
10
4
12th
1980 Lotus 81 Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8 14 0 0 0 0 1 20th
1981 Alfa Romeo 179C
179B
179D
Alfa Romeo 3.0 V12 7
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
17th
1982 Williams
Ferrari
FW07C
126C2
Ford Cosworth 3.0 V8
Ferrari 3.0 V6T
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
4
19th
INDYCAR CAREER
Season Team Engine Races Poles Wins Podiums Pts Rank
1979 Penske Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 1 0 0 1 700 11th
1980 Penske Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 4 2 1 2 580 16th
1981 Patrick Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 7 1 0 4 81 11th
1982 Patrick Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 11 0 0 6 188 3rd
1983 Newman/Haas Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 13 2 2 6 133 3rd
1984 Newman/Haas Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 16 8 6 8 176 1st
1985 Newman/Haas Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 14 3 3 5 114 5th
1986 Newman/Haas Racing Cosworth DFX V8T 17 3 2 4 136 5th
1987 Newman/Haas Racing Chevrolet 265A V8T 15 8 2 3 100 6th
1988 Newman/Haas Racing Chevrolet 265A V8T 15 0 2 7 126 5th
1989 Newman/Haas Racing Chevrolet 265A V8T 15 0 0 4 110 6th
1990 Newman/Haas Racing Chevrolet 265A V8T 16 0 0 4 136 7th
1991 Newman/Haas Racing Chevrolet 265A V8T 17 0 0 4 132 7th
1992 Newman/Haas Racing Ford XB V8T 15 1 0 1 105 6th
1993 Newman/Haas Racing Ford XB V8T 16 1 1 3 117 6th
1994 Newman/Haas Racing Ford XB V8T 16 0 0 1 45 14th
INDIANAPOLIS 500 CAREER HIGHLIGHTS
Year Team Chassis Engine Start Finish
1965 Dean Van Lines Racing Hawk Ford 4th 3rd
1966 Dean Van Lines Racing Hawk Ford 1st 18th (DNF)
1967 Dean Van Lines Racing Hawk Ford 1st 30th (DNF)
1968 Andretti Racing Enterprises Hawk Ford 4th 33rd (DNF)
1969 STP Corporation Hawk Ford 2nd 1st
1970 STP Corporation McNamara Ford 8th 6th
1971 STP Corporation McNamara Ford 9th 30th (DNF)
1972 Parnelli Jones Racing Parnelli Offenhauser 5th 8th (DNF)
1973 Parnelli Jones Racing Parnelli Offenhauser 6th 30th (DNF)
1974 Parnelli Jones Racing Eagle Offenhauser 5th 31st (DNF)
1975 Parnelli Jones Racing Eagle Offenhauser 27th 28th (DNF)
1976 Penske Racing McLaren Offenhauser 19th 8th
1977 Penske Racing McLaren Cosworth 6th 26th (DNF)
1978 Penske Racing Penske Cosworth 33rd 12th
1980 Penske Racing Penske Cosworth 2nd 20th (DNF)
1981 Patrick Racing Wildcat Cosworth 32nd 2nd
1982 Patrick Racing Wildcat Cosworth 4th 31st (DNF)
1983 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Cosworth 11th 23rd (DNF)
1984 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Cosworth 6th 17th (DNF)
1985 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Cosworth 4th 2nd
1986 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Cosworth 30th 32nd (DNF)
1987 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Chevrolet 1st 9th
1988 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Chevrolet 4th 20th (DNF)
1989 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Chevrolet 5th 4th
1990 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Chevrolet 6th 27th (DNF)
1991 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Chevrolet 3rd 7th (DNF)
1992 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Mk4 Ford Cosworth 3rd 23rd (DNF)
1993 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Mk4 Ford Cosworth 2nd 5th
1994 Newman/Haas Racing Lola Mk4 Ford Cosworth 9th 32nd (DNF)
OTHER CAREER HIGHLIGHTS
Year Event (Class) Team Car Co-Driver(s) Result
1966 Le Mans 24 Hours (P +5.0) Holman & Moody Ford GT40 Mk.II Lucien Bianchi DNF
1967 Daytona 500
Sebring 12 Hours (P)
Le Mans 24 Hours (P +5.0)
Ford Motor Co.
Holman & Moody
Holman & Moody
Ford GT40 Mk.II
Ford
Ford GT40 Mk.II
Bruce McLaren

Lucien Bianchi
1st
1st
DNF
1970 Sebring 12 Hours (S5.0) SpA Ferrari SEFAC Ferrari 512 S Ignazio Giunti
Nino Vaccarella
3rd
1972 Daytona 6 Hours
Brands Hatch 1000Km
Watkins Glen 6 Hours
SpA Ferrari SEFAC Ferrari 312PB Jacky Ickx 1st
1st
1st
1974 Monza 1000Km Autodelta SpA Alfa Romeo 33TT12 Arturo Merzario 1st
1983 Le Mans 24 Hours (C) Porsche Kremer Racing Porsche 956 Michael Andretti
Philippe Alliot
3rd
1988 Le Mans 24 Hours (C1) Porsche AG Porsche 962C Michael Andretti
John Andretti
6th
1995 Le Mans 24 Hours (WSC) Courage Compétition Courage C34 Bob Wollek
Éric Hélary
1st
1996 Le Mans 24 Hours (LMP1) Courage Compétition Courage C36 Jan Lammers
Derek Warwick
3rd
1997 Le Mans 24 Hours (LMP) Courage Compétition Courage C36 Michael Andretti
Olivier Grouillard
DNF
2000 Le Mans 24 Hours (LMP900) Panoz Motorsports Panoz LMP1 Roadster David Brabham
Jan Magnussen
8th


Biography

The word ‘legend’ is sometimes bandied around too much in motorsport, but in the case of Mario Andretti, this term would be a gross understatement to his illustrious achievements.

There are few drivers before, and even fewer since, who have tasted success across such a wide range of motorsport championships in a racing career spanning five decades.  A four-time USAC and IndyCar champion, a Formula 1 World Champion, a winner of the Le Mans 24 Hours, Sebring 12 Hours, Daytona 500, and Pikes Peak Hill Climb – the list of achievements is seemingly endless.

Andretti was born during World War II in what is now Croatia, fleeing with his parents and twin brother Aldo as poor immigrants to the United States.  His interest in motorsport was forged early in his childhood, having visited the Monza circuit and idolised the great Alberto Ascari.

As soon as they were old enough, he and Aldo started competing in sprint and midget racing.  His first notable win came in 1962 and he was a regular victor thereafter.

In 1964 he made his USAC debut, and scored his first major win in 1965 en route to claiming the first of his four USAC / IndyCar championship titles at the age of just 25.  He earned ‘Rookie of the Year’ honours at that year’s Indianapolis 500 with a third-place finish.  Another eight victories in 1966 saw him claim back-to-back USAC crowns.

Showcasing his multidisciplinary skills, he won the first of three Sebring 12 Hour crowns in 1967, sharing a Ford GT40 with Bruce McLaren.  He also entered and won the Daytona 500, while only bad luck prevented him from winning the 1967 and 1968 USAC titles, finishing runner-up in both seasons.

His dream of Grand Prix racing came in 1968 with an opportunity to drive for Team Lotus at Monza.  He qualified an impressive eleventh-fastest but was unable to take the start due to a clashing race commitment in the USA.  Next time out at his home event at Watkins Glen, he sensationally qualified on pole position.

Continued USAC racing clashes limited his opportunities beyond a handful of outings over the next two seasons with Lotus (1969) and March (1970).  He was also earning plaudits in endurance racing, claiming a second Sebring 12 Hours win for the factory Ferrari team in 1970.

That earned him an F1 call-up with the Italian outfit for 1971, posting the fastest lap en route to victory in his debut race for the team in South Africa.  He continued to divide his time between USAC and sports car racing that year, enjoying particular success in the latter by claiming four wins in the 312P alongside Jacky Ickx.

The 1973 and 1974 years were largely spent Stateside, racing selected USAC events while also competing in the local Formula 5000 championship. He finished runner-up in both years, while three wins propelled him to the 1974 USAC National Dirt Racing Championship title.

He stayed with the Parnelli F5000 operation in 1975, and despite being consistently the quickest driver in the field he again finished runner-up in the standings.  That year saw him lead Parnelli’s tilt at Formula 1, but after little success the outfit sudden withdrew early in the 1976 season.

He had opened the 1976 Formula 1 season with Team Lotus, but was so spooked by its 77 chassis that he vowed never to drive it again.  Without a drive thanks to Parnelli’s departure, Lotus founder Colin Chapman convinced Andretti to return, believing that he could revive the team’s fortunes and turn the car into a race-winner.  Their efforts worked, with Andretti claiming victory at the end of the season in torrential conditions at Fuji.

Chapman pioneered ‘ground effect’ technology in 1977 with the introduction of the type 78 chassis.  Andretti was often the driver to beat in terms of sheer speed and despite claiming four victories he only finished third in the standings thanks to too many engine failures and a few tangles with rival drivers.

He made no such mistake the following year and was all but unstoppable once the 79 chassis was introduced at the Belgian Grand Prix.  He qualified the iconic black-and-gold car on the front row for ten successive Grands Prix – seven of these from pole position – and won six races by the Dutch Grand Prix.  He and his number-two teammate Ronnie Peterson were all but unstoppable, and what should have been a triumphant title celebration at Monza was blackened by the Swedish driver’s death following complications after his start-line crash.

His title defence in 1979 was hindered by Chapman pushing the envelope too far with the type 80 chassis, which only ran for a handful of races.  Andretti persevered, typically finishing in the points if his car held together.

With rival outfits having made more progress with ‘ground effect’ technology, Lotus seemingly stood still.  The 1980 season was even worse, with Andretti scraping a single point in the final race at Watkins Glen.

Sentiment as much as anything saw him join the factory Alfa Romeo team for 1981.  The partnership started well with fourth place first time out at Long Beach, but Andretti would not grace the points again all season as the inadequacies of the car were laid bare.  Despite outpacing young teammate Bruno Giacomelli for much of the year, the Italian outscored the veteran thanks to a podium finish at the Caesars Palace Grand Prix.

Hating the ‘ground effect’ cars, Andretti opted for a full-time return to IndyCar racing for 1982.  Driving for Patrick Racing, he finished third in the standings although victory proved elusive.

After a one-off Formula 1 outing for Williams at Long Beach when Carlos Reutemann suddenly retired from racing, Andretti returned again to F1 competition later that year when Ferrari needed a driver to replace the injured Didier Pironi.  Aged 42, he incredibly put the car on pole at Monza, however, a sticking throttle saw him finish third.

Thereafter, Andretti was a fixture in the IndyCar Series, racing for twelve successive seasons with the Newman/Haas Racing stable. While he wouldn’t win another title after the 1984 season, he remained competitive well into his fifties. He treated the 1994 season as an extended farewell tour, pulling down the curtain on his 407-race IndyCar career with an incredible record of 52 wins.

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